Saving Acts In Faith

A story called “Ninety-Three” written by Victor Hugo tells of a ship caught in a dangerous storm on the high seas. At the height of the storm, the frightened sailors heard a terrible crashing noise below the deck. They knew at once that this new noise came from a cannon, part of the ship’s cargo, that had broken loose. It was moving back and forth with the swaying of the ship, crashing into the side of the ship with terrible impact. Knowing that it could cause the ship to sink, two brave sailors volunteered to make the dangerous attempt to retie the loose cannon. They knew the danger of a shipwreck from a loose cannon was greater than the fury of the storm. Storms of life may blow about us, but it is not the exterior storms such as the one that rose upon the disciples while Christ was sleeping in the stern that pose the gravest danger. It is our faith, which has loosened and ultimately broken away from the gift of the spirit within us that leaves us vulnerable. ¬†Instead we become attached to doubt, fear, distraction and disillusionment which seem to engulf our lives in Christ. Although furious storms outside may be raging, what is going on inside can pose the greater threat to our lives. Much like the sailors, at times we must be willing to take the risk of saving acts in faith continually in this journey because our hope lies in regaining and holding fast to that which keeps us reconciled in God’s peace as we wait out the storm.