A Servant’s Courage

“As the Lord of hosts lives,… I will surely show myself to him (King Ahab) today. 1Kings 18:1-19   After three years, upon Elijah’a return from Zarepath, he meets Obadiah. When asked to go back to the king with the message that Elijah has returned, Obadiah, wants nothing to do with it for fear of his own life. Elijah assures him that this day was not about Obadiah’s life, he would have to trust God and deliver the message. Fear hinders courage in the best of us. Yet, walking in Christ isn’t about walking in courage. In spite of our fears, it’s about walking in faith of the knowledge of a God that keeps promises. For the God that is at work in Elijah is the same God at work in us (Philippians 2:12-30).

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Promise Already Kept

No distrust made him (Abraham) waver concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, being fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. Romans 4:13-25   Sometimes the things we desire seem to take forever. Consider Abraham who was 100 years old before Isaac was born. Every day given is a gift and our faith should make us stronger as we breathe in the gratitude of God’s blessing and exhale with praise of his everlasting peace. Abraham’s experience is a lesson in waiting with the confidence that the God of this universe keeps promises. We have a tendency to want to hurry things along. Remember Hagar and Ishmael? Let’s not create more drama than we need. As we wait on God, let’s begin to walk with him as well. WWYD today?

Therefore his faith ‘was reckoned to him as righteousness.’ Now the words, ‘it was reckoned to him’, were written not for his sake alone, but for ours also. It will be reckoned to us who believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was handed over to death for our trespasses and was raised for our justification. Romans 4:13-25

Did I Say That?

Perhaps we should take some responsibility for what was about to happen. We’ve always tried to emphasize the importance of telling the truth. While the policeman is taking the accident report, my son faithfully offers; “I didn’t look both ways”. What! You just admitted to fault!  I suppose we could chalk it up to inexperience on his part, but the number one unwritten rule in an auto accident is never admit to fault particularly, if you believe you’ve broken a written rule (in his case, at the stop sign, after making a full and complete stop, look both ways!) Let the insurance company figure it all out.

We’ve all been there. Sometimes we say things which we later wish we hadn’t said because the consequence or the price to be paid is too high or worse, we find our selves in a position of having to make a decision that challenges our integrity. Having to separate  our feelings (who we believe our selves to be) from our image (how others perceive us) in order to “save face” can be very painful and sometimes damaging to the self. Soon enough we find that there is little room for falsehoods or grandiose facades. There will always be a time when we have to “put up or shut up.” King Herod, found himself in such a situation, desperately needing to be more important (perhaps than he really was) and in control of everything, everybody and every situation. However, when your integrity is on the line (that’s all the time) we should be more careful about making promises we don’t really want to keep (this is different from promises you make every effort to keep). At any rate, what’s a King with a foot in his mouth suppose to do?

Mark 6:23 …and he (King Herod) solemnly swore to her, “Whatever of ask me, I will give you, even half my kingdom.”